UTU Masters | Turku
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New academic year is about to start and I guess that new students have more and more questions related to their first days in Turku. That’s why I decided to make this post which contains a variety of random information which I got from my tutor, and which my friend and I prepared for our degree tutees. Hope it will be helpful : )
Learning, Learning Environments and Educational Systems (LLEES) programme requires from students to complete an internship related to the field of education. My groupmate and friend, Bushra Shareef, kindly agreed to share her experience regarding her internship at Turku International School (TIS).
Do you have a habit to go to the library? Before coming to Finland for me it was definitely something not common as I associated it with a gloomy place with a specific smell of old dust. But Turku showed me libraries from another light. They are spacious, bright, colourful, and welcoming.
I assume that when students enter a university, there is a certain number of questions they need to solve quite urgently. One of such matters is the schedule of the courses you are going to attend. There are so many of them, and you feel so enthusiastic that you want to try everything which is impossible due to overlaps. At least that’s what I experienced during my first year in Turku : D All the elective courses sounded fascinating and it was a torture to choose some of them. When hearing about this «problem», my friend advised me to take «Multicultural Education». She characterised it as a «must have».  To be honest, it even exceeded my expectations.
Do you have an image of typical Finnish students? Before coming to Turku I had no idea that there can be anything special about their outfit. I am quite used to the fact that university students don’t have any distinguishing clothes. At least that is common for my home country. But Finland surprised me by its tradition.

When I thought what to show to my mother during her visit to Finland, my friend suggested visiting the Botanical Garden which belongs to the University of Turku. It was definitely a great idea! Right now it doesn’t look so colourful like in the photos,...

Juhani is a typical young Finn studying at University of Turku. His name has been the most popular one in Finland for years. I am lucky to have him as a friend before coming here. Although Juhani is extremely friendly, helpful, and nice, he feels shy to talk about himself and personal issues. This blog is about you, Juhani, as a small gilt although you may not expect it. * The real name of my Finnish friend has been changed and the character in my article is fictitiously formed, but vividly reflects a Finnish portrait.
As usual, it will take you months to get acquainted with a new environment, arrange your personal life, studies, and friend connection. This phase may be short or long depending on your own adaptability. And then, let’s look for a part-time job as an essential part of student life. Though finding a part time job for international students is commonly assumed to be quite challenging in Finland in general because although Finland has a quite open mind, local workers are always prioritized due to Finnish language. However, I have to say that it depends on the place you live.  As a common rule, things gonna be easier in the capital and big cities where there are plenty of job opportunities, while less chances to work in other group of cities.
To my mind, a good transportation system is essential for any city. Everyday people need to go to work, school, university, shopping, etc. and it obviously takes time. The thing is that the above mentioned places can be far from each other. That’s why it’s just great to know that buses can help you to reach various areas on time.